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- Peruvian Blankets -

- PROCESS・Peruvian Blankets -

Weaving x Inkaterra・Peru

Location. 13.3911° S, 72.0478° W | Chinchero, Peru

This photographic documentary takes you through the process of creating an alpaca blanket. We partnered with Peruvian weavers that have been creating intricate textile patterns since the Inca Empire. They are champion weavers-to say the least. Your blanket was created by weavers from a small village in the mountainous highlands of Peru called Chinchero.

Chinchero is a traditional farming village known for producing potatoes, beans, quinoa and barley. Farming does not provide enough money to support a family. This reality led women in the village to supplement their family's income through their weaving skills. This is where your blanket comes from.



Context. Peruvian weavers have been creating intricate textile patterns since the Inca Empire. They are champion weavers-to say the least. Your blanket was created by weavers from a small village in the mountainous highlands of Peru called Chinchero.

Chinchero is a traditional farming village known for producing potatoes, beans, quinoa and barley. Farming does not provide enough money to support a family. This reality led women in the village to supplement their family's income through their weaving skills. This is where your blanket comes from.

Process. One blanket takes roughly a week to create. It begins by shearing the animal. Then the fibers are milled into yarn.

The Andes has a range of biodiversity. Weavers work with the environment to create natural dyes for their yarn. For example, the cochineal is used to create red dye. It's an insect that looks like a tiny cockroach, and found on the prickly pear cactus.

After the dying is complete, the yarn is hand-loomed into a blanket.


Visit. If you want to meet the weaver who made your blanket, or better understand the process of hand-loomed textiles, the hotel concierge would be happy to arrange transportation to visit Chinchero. We recommend planning to take half a day for transit, visiting the village, and meeting amazing humans.